Giorgio Armani’s Fiat 500 Makeover Uses Leather For Interior

In Article3 Minutes

Month: September 2021

According to GQ Magazine, fashion legend Giorgio Armani helped design a very special Fiat 500 as part of a charity project. Alongside a grey-green, silk-effect metal body, alloy trims and a folding fabric roof, this sexy little number included an interior “as chic as it is sustainable” featuring natural controlled-origin leather, wool fabric and regenerated wood. Proceeds from the sale of the one-off car were earmarked for the Earth Alliance – Leonardo DiCaprio’s climate change-fighting non-profit organisation.

Leather remains the go-to material not only for style, comfort and practicality but for sustainability too. It offers whole lifetime performance for car seats thanks to its functional properties and durability. Historically, it has always been a preferred material for many reasons including its longevity and endurance: if treated well, genuine leather will remain in pristine condition.

As a natural material, leather is also both strong and flexible – ideal properties for a car seat. In addition, it is resistant to soiling, staining, scuffing and scratching. Due to its lightfastness, leather will keep its colour and appearance, while its natural ability to resist heat makes the material flame retardant. Day-in, day-out, leather maintains its properties in any car interior.

It’s also nice to see that an eco-friendly, electric car like the Armani Fiat 500 chooses natural leather to fit in with the sustainability narrative of the design in contrast to faux leather (vinyl) which is made from petroleum-based plastics and less sustainable.

Interestingly, Armani and his design partners also equipped the fashionable Fiat with anti-pollution and anti-bacterial technology. Leather’s structure and the way it is processed provides natural resistance to bacteria and car buyers are increasingly requesting it as an option for this reason.

It’s also nice to see that an eco-friendly, electric car like the Armani Fiat 500 chooses natural leather to fit in with the sustainability narrative of the design in contrast to faux leather (vinyl) which is made from petroleum-based plastics and less sustainable. As a fully bio-degradable material with a very long useful life expectancy which is derived as a by-product of the food industry, leather is the perfect green complement to this design tour de force.

Read the full article here.

(With thanks to Leather Naturally for the original link)

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    Time To Put The Record Straight: The Leather Industry Fights Back

    In Article, News1 Minutes

    Month: September 2021

    Leather UK recently issued a ‘Global Leather Industry Position Statement on Leather Alternatives’. Supported by various organisations including ICT (International Council of Tanners), ICSHLTA, IULTCS, COTANCE and Leather Naturally, it sets out the key reasons why the sustainability claims of leather alternatives are questionable. It also reiterates that, as a “durable, biodegradable, circular material”, leather is preferable to synthetic materials with – at best – unsubstantiated sustainability credentials.

    Key points from the statement include:

    • Leather is a long-lasting, biodegradable material made from a renewable residual product of another industry.
    • Emerging alternatives to leather are largely comprised of fossil fuel-based plastics.
    • The leather industry’s upcycling of a residual material from the food sector reduces greenhouse gas emissions while creating a valuable and versatile product.
    • Little or nothing is known about the performance and composition of the ‘new’ materials or the sustainability of their related production processes.
    • In a recent analysis by the German institute FILK, none of the alternative materials could match leather across all functional performance parameters tested.

    While welcoming diversity in the market, the co-signees of the statement object to the “appropriation of the image of leather” and the misleading criticism leather receives. It is a powerful statement and one that One 4 Leather heartily supports.

    Read the original article HERE

    (With acknowledgement to Leather UK)

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